Loading...
X

DPP: Part 2 ? Digital Image Qualities: Assignment 2 ? Seeing like your camera: Image Set 2 ? Street scene

This second set of images are for the street scene – which required images taken in the middle of a clear, sunny day – on narrow streets with high buildings which cast deep, long shadows.  These were taken over a couple of trips to Manchester.

Image 1 – Shambles Square, Mid-afternoon

Shambles Square - ISO200, f/16, 1/160s.  Click to see on Flickr

Shambles Square – ISO200, f/16, 1/160s. Click to see on Flickr.

Shambles square is an old part of Manchester, dating back to 1552, so provides some contrast from the modern appearance of the Metrolink and Media City in particular – which also appears in this set.  On a sunny day it’s always rammed so this is a fairly typical afternoon scene.

When taking this image the strong shadows from neighbouring buildings have led to high contrast from the dark tones in shade to the white of the main subjects in the scene; Sinclairs Oyster Bar and The Old Wellington which form two sides of the square.

This is an image I think would be improved by some post-processing to add some fill-light, particularly for the building on the left (The Mitre).  However I could have done more “on location”; repositioning to remove the Mitre from the image and having Sinclairs and the Wellington more dominant in the image.  A longer exposure might also have worked, as there is no real detail in the white areas of the buildings so a bit of clipping may not have detracted from the image much.

Shambles Histogram

Shambles Histogram

The histogram shows a lot of the dark tones in the image where details will be lost.  This image is possibly a good candidate for me to revisit in part two of this assignment.

Difference between how I saw this scene, and how it turned out:

I didn’t expect the dark areas to be quite so dark in this image – the human eye clearly deals with these scenes much better than a camera can.

Image 2 – Metro from Shudehill

Metro and Shudehill.  ISO200, f/16, 1/100s.  Click to see on Flickr.

Metro and Shudehill. ISO200, f/16, 1/100s. Click to see on Flickr.

The challenge here was a matter of timing; the dark shadow results in a lot of detail on the metro being lost, so I aimed to capture the image as the metro emerged into the sunlight.  There’s not too much by way of bright tones in the image.  Detail is lost in the dark tones, however this helps to give more prominence to the front of the metro and the building on the left.

Metro and Shudehill Histogram

Metro and Shudehill Histogram

The histogram confirms the bias toward darker tones where detail is lost, but the yellow of the metro is around the middle-to-bright tonal area showing that part has been well-exposed as intended.

Difference between how I saw this scene, and how it turned out:

Unlike the first shot, it was fairly obvious the dark shadow would come out quite dark and contrast with the rest of the scene, so this is very close to how I expected it to come out.

Image 3 – Metro at Media City

Metro and Media City.  ISO200, f/22, 1/50s.  Click to see on Flickr.

Metro and Media City. ISO200, f/22, 1/50s. Click to see on Flickr.

I wanted to include Media City and a BBC building as it’s a reasonably new development for the region and for the Metrolink itself.  I used f/22 to maximise the depth-of-field so ensuring the ‘BBC’ sign was visible and readable, while the metro was in sharp focus in the foreground.  The image was taken a couple of hours earlier in the day, and at the start of autumn, so the shadows are not as harsh as in the other images.  The glass of the stop also meant there were less shadows around so it made it easier to get a well-exposed image.

Metrolink and Media City Histogram

Metrolink and Media City Histogram

While there is a bias toward the darker tones there is no clipping and only a few patches of darker areas on the metro where detail isn’t obvious, but it’s not lost altogether either.  Once again the yellow of the metro is clearly indicated and well-exposed.

Difference between how I saw this scene, and how it turned out:

There were no surprises for me with this one – how the camera saw it was very similar to how I saw it.

%d bloggers like this: