Part One – Outdoor Scenes

Part one of this exercise is to create three images of scenes using different white balance settings on the camera.  The scenes will be in sunlight, cloud and shade on a sunny day.  The white balance settings to be used are; auto, daylight, shade and cloud.

These are presented below with my observations

Sunlit scene

Auto

Auto White Balance

Auto White Balance

The “coolest” in tone-terms of the images.

Daylight

Daylight White Balance

Daylight White Balance

The most appropriate setting for the scene and I think the most accurate/pleasing too.

Shade

Shade White Balance

Shade White Balance

The image has taken on a yellow tinge, which is most obvious in the clouds and white areas.

Cloud

Cloud White Balance

Cloud White Balance

The yellow tinge is less obvious here than in the ‘shade’ version.  In both cases the images look more like evening sun than the late morning sun they were actually shot in.

 Cloudy scene

Auto

Auto White Balance

Auto White Balance

As before, the “coolest” in tone.  As far as I know, there’s no reason that should be the case as a rule.

Daylight

Daylight White Balance

Daylight White Balance

Less of a blue tinge to this version.

Shade

Shade White Balance

Shade White Balance

There’s not a massive difference to the ‘daylight’ version, previous. Very slightly warmer but not significantly so.

Cloudy

Cloud White Balance

Cloud White Balance

The warmest of the images, but adding a yellow tinge to the scene.  I think the ‘shade’ version looks slightly better.

Shade on a sunny day

Auto

Auto White Balance

Auto White Balance

Again the coolest toned image of the set.

Daylight

Daylight White Balance

Daylight White Balance

Slightly warmer.

Shade

Shade White Balance

Shade White Balance

A warmer tone again.  I think is the one I prefer, as the others looked too cold – which the actual scene didn’t appear to be when I was there.

Cloudy

Cloud White Balance

Cloud White Balance

Slightly warmer than the daylight version, cooler than the shade version – but still a bit too cool in tone for my liking.

Part two – indoor/outdoor scene

The next part of this exercise involved a shot with incandescent lighting against a bluish, dusk, sky.  Given tungsten bulbs can’t be bought anymore for modern fittings I’ve gone back to an image from an exercise in my first module, and applied different white balance settings in Lightroom.  Even then, I think the bulb simulated tungsten but was actually fluorescent; I do wonder whether the course material needs to be updated given it’s simply not possible to do unless you have a stash of old bulbs!  The settings to apply were daylight, tungsten/incandescent and auto.

Daylight

Daylight White Balance

Daylight White Balance

The sky appears to be what I’d expect but the interior is very orange.

Tungsten

Tungsten White Balance

Tungsten White Balance

The whole image appears far too blue now, even the sky appears too blue.

Auto

Auto White Balance

Auto White Balance

Slightly more orange than daylight – which includes the sky too.

Custom

Custom White Balance

Custom White Balance

In the final version I’ve used the white balance picker in Lightroom to select part of the white wall and then adjusted the colour temperature to reach a compromise I think looks like a good balance between outdoor and indoor light.

Conclusion

It’s clear the programmed settings aren’t able to cope with this combination very well, and manually that’s really possible is a compromise – unless selective adjustment of white balance is available.

This has been an incredibly tedious exercise – as I don’t feel I’ve learnt anything I didn’t know before – and it’s been far to involved for no sense of reward.  The other exercise, while very technical, at least delivered some sense of new knowledge so haven’t bored me – that hasn’t been the case here.  I think I need to try and make sure my assignment involves something creative – else take a break from course photos to focus on a mini-project “just for fun”, as this course’s technical focus does take the fun out of it all.