The aim of this exercise is to demonstrate the advantages of shooting when the sun is low.  I’m to choose any subjects, so long as they are in sunlight, and take shots with; frontal lighting – with the sun behind the camera; side lighting – with the sun to left or right; back lighting – shooting toward the sun; edge lighting – with these sun outside the viewfinder and the edge of the subject lit.

All shots were shot on aperture priority.

Frontal Lighting

ISO 100, f/11, 1/250s

The tree’s shadow was handy here – the low sun casts long shadows, including my own (Long shadow?) so I stood in the shade of the tree so my own shadow would not appear in the shot.

The brightness of the house brings out a contrast with the shadows and darker areas of the shot.

Side Lighting

ISO 200, f/11, 1/160s

A lot more contrasts within this image than with the sun straight on at the subject.  I like the mix of light and shade – with the darker areas almost adding a hint of mystery.

It took a couple of shots to ensure the side of the house wasn’t too bright, or the shade wasn’t too dark and lacking detail.

Back Lighting

ISO 200, f/11, 1/400s

I used bracketed shots for this image, but the measures exposure worked anyhow.  I’ve done a similar shot to this before (actually, a much better one), with the sunlight shining through the petals to light them.

I also really liked this ‘accident’; it’s the faster shutter-speed version from another group of three bracketed shots.  The lens flare wasn’t intentional, but I like how it creates a kind of ‘spotlight’ on the flower.

Spotlight

Edge Lighting

ISO 100, f/8, 1/400s

Again, I used bracketed shots for this one – 1 stop apart – but the camera-measured exposure turned out the best; there’s just enough detail in the shadow areas, but it’s not so bright so as the side light on the subject would ‘blend in’.  I like the way the light highlights details of the subject on it’s edges – including the fine detail in the string on the right of the image.